2 Lecturer/Senior Lecturer positions at St Andrews

We're looking to recruit new academics as part of a large on-going expansion of our academic staff. We wish to appoint two new Lecturers/Senior Lecturers (depending on experience) to join our vibrant teaching and research community that is ranked amongst the top venues for Computer Science education and research worldwide.

The successful candidate will be expected to have a range of interests, to be active in research publication that strengthens or complements those in the School and to be capable of teaching the subject to undergraduate and taught postgraduate students who come to us with a wide range of backgrounds.

Excellent teaching skills and an interest in promoting knowledge exchange are essential. You should also have some familiarity with grant-seeking processes in relation to research councils and other sources.

More details are available on the university vacancies page. Informal enquiries can be directed to Professor Steve Linton (hos-cs@st-andrews.ac.uk) or Dr Dharini Balasubramaniam (dot-cs@st-andrews.ac.uk).

PhD position in proximal sensing available at UCD Dublin

A PhD position is available at UCD, my old employer, int he area of location sensing.

Ph.D. Studentship Available

Proximal Sensing University College Dublin, Ireland

A Ph.D. studentship is now available in the School of Computer Science, University College Dublin, Ireland. The objective of the Ph.D. research project is to develop transformative algorithms for proximal sensing in outdoor environments using active and passive technologies, including LIDAR, imaging, and UWB radar. The research intersects the fields of image processing, digital signal processing, and machine learning.

The project is part of a larger research programme, CONSUS, which brings together the Schools of Computer Science, Agriculture and Food Science at UCD and Origin Enterprises Plc. The programme is focused on the development of novel precision agriculture techniques for enhanced crop production. CONSUS is jointly funded by Science Foundation Ireland and Origin Enterprises Plc.

The successful candidate will have obtained, or will expect to obtain, a 1st class or 2.1 honours B.Sc. or B.Eng. degree in computer science, electronic engineering, or a related discipline. The successful candidate will have the ability to work both independently and as part of a multi-disciplinary team. The successful candidate will have excellent problem solving and communications skills, as well as an on-going commitment to research. A M.Sc. or M.Eng. degree or commercial experience in a relevant area is an advantage. Prior knowledge of the research topics associated with the project is an advantage.

The Ph.D. position is funded for 4 years. Funding includes payment of a tax-free student stipend plus SFI fees contribution. The starting date for the position is September 2017 or as soon as possible thereafter.

A full CV giving details of courses completed, marks obtained, relevant experience, and the names of two referees should be sent to:

Assoc. Prof. Chris Bleakley School of Computer Science University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Telephone +35317162915 Email chris.bleakley@ucd.ie Web http://goo.gl/bP7qWw

3-year postdoctoral researcher post available

As part of the Science of Sensor Systems Software programme we have a 3-year postdoc post available.

The S4 programme aims to develop a unifying science, across the breadth of mathematics, computer science and engineering, that will let developers engineer for the uncertainty and ensure that their systems and the information they provide is resilient, responsive, reliable, statistically sound and robust. The vision is smarter sensor based systems in which scientists and policy makers can ask deeper questions and be confident in obtaining reliable answers, so the programme will deliver new principles and techniques for the development and deployment of verifiable, reliable, autonomous sensor systems that operate in uncertain, multiple and multi-scale environments.

S4 is funded by EPSRC as a five-year, £5.2M Programme Grant. It brings together four of the UK’s leading research teams in sensor systems, their design, analysis, deployment, and evaluation. Led overall by Prof Muffy Calder at the University of Glasgow, the other academic collaborators are the University of St Andrews (Prof Simon Dobson), the University of Liverpool (Prof Michael Fisher), and Imperial College (Prof Julie McCann). S4 also includes a portfolio of industrial partners ranging from start-up SMEs to multinational companies and State agencies.

St Andrews leads the work on adaptive systems engineering, especially on how systems need to change as time progresses, the system components fail, and goals change. We are looking for someone to join us to work on how to program adaptive sensor systems. A strong track record in sensor systems, programming languages, data analytics, or another related area is essential, as is an ability to work within a larger team using formal methods, advanced statistics, and novel programming languages and approaches

You can find full application details here.

Call for papers: 11th IEEE International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems

SASO 2017 is now accepting paper submissions. Come and join us in Arizona!

SASO 2017

University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ · 18-22 September 2017

Aims and Scope

The aim of the Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems conference series (SASO) is to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of research on the foundations of engineered systems that self-adapt and self-organize. The complexity of current and emerging networks, software, and services can be characterized by issues such as scale, heterogeneity, openness, and dynamics in the environment. This has led the software engineering, distributed systems, and management communities to look for inspiration in diverse fields (e.g., complex systems, control theory, artificial intelligence, chemistry, psychology, sociology, and biology) to find new ways of designing and managing such computing systems in a principled way. In this endeavor, self-organization and self-adaptation have emerged as two promising interrelated approaches. They form the basis for many other so-called self-* properties, such as self-configuration, self-healing, or self-optimization. SASO aims to be an interdisciplinary meeting, where contributions from participants with different backgrounds leads to the fostering of a cross-pollination of ideas, and where innovative theories, frameworks, methodologies, tools, and applications can emerge.

The eleventh edition of the SASO conference embraces this inter-disciplinary nature, and welcomes novel contributions to both the foundational and application-focused dimensions of self-adaptive and self-organizing systems research. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Systems theory: nature-inspired and socially-inspired paradigms and heuristics; inter-operation of self- mechanisms; theoretical frameworks and models; control theory;
  • System properties: robustness; resilience; stability; anti-fragility; diversity; self-reference and reflection; emergent behavior; computational awareness and self-awareness;
  • Systems engineering: reusable mechanisms and algorithms; design patterns; architectures; methodologies; software and middleware development frameworks and methods; platforms and toolkits; multi-agent systems;
  • Theory and practice of organization: self-governance, change management, electronic institutions, distributed consensus, commons, knowledge management, and the general use of rules, policies, etc. in self- systems
  • Theory and practice of adaptation: mechanisms for adaptation, including evolution, logic, learning; adaptability, plasticity, flexibility
  • Socio-technical systems: human and social factors; visualization; crowdsourcing and collective awareness; humans-in-the-loop; ethics and humanities in self- systems;
  • Data-driven approaches: data mining; machine learning; data science and other statistical techniques to analyze, understand, and manage behavior of complex systems;
  • Self-adaptive and self-organizing hardware: self- materials; self-construction; reconfigurable hardware;
  • Education: experience reports; curricula; innovative course concepts; methodological aspects of self- systems education;
  • Applications and experiences with self- systems in any of the following domains are of particular interest:
    • Smart systems: smart grids, smart cities, smart environments, smart homes, etc.
    • Industrial automation: embedded self- systems, adaptive industrial plants, Industry 4.0, cyber physical systems
    • Transportation: autonomous vehicles, traffic optimization
    • Autonomous systems: aerial vehicles, undersea vehicles, autonomous robotics
    • Internet of Things: self- for network management, self- applied to cyber security
We are looking for contributions that present new fundamental understanding of self-adaptive and self-organizing systems and how they can be engineered and used, including: novel theoretical or experimental results, novel design patterns, mechanisms, system architectures, frameworks, tools, and practical experiences in building or deploying systems and applications. Contributions contrasting different approaches for engineering a given family of systems, or demonstrating the applicability of a certain approach for different systems, are equally encouraged. Likewise, papers describing substantial innovation or insights in the use and communication of self- systems in the classroom are welcome.

Where relevant and appropriate, accepted papers will also be encouraged to participate in the Demo or Poster Sessions.

Important Dates

Abstract submission May 1, 2017
Paper submission May 10, 2017
Notification June 30, 2017
Camera ready copy due July 12, 2017
Conference September 18-22, 2017

Submission Instructions

Submissions can be up to 10 pages, formatted according to the standard IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide, and submitted electronically in PDF format. Please submit your papers using the SASO 2017 conference management system:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=saso2017.

The proceedings will be published by IEEE Computer Society Press, and made available as a part of the IEEE Digital Library. Note that a separate Call for Poster and Demo Submissions will also be issued. As per the standard IEEE policies, all submissions should be original, i.e., they should not have been previously published in any conference proceedings, book, or journal and should not currently be under review for another archival conference. We also highlight IEEE’s policies regarding plagiarism and self-plagiarism (http://www.ieee.org/.../ID_Plagiarism.html).

Review Criteria

Papers should present novel ideas in the cross-disciplinary research context described in this call, motivated by problems from current practice or applied research. Both theoretical and empirical contributions should be highlighted, substantiated by formal analysis, simulation, experimental evaluations, or comparative studies, etc. Appropriate references must be made to related work. Because SASO is a cross-disciplinary conference, we encourage papers to be intelligible and relevant to researchers who are not members of the same specialized sub-field.

Authors are also encouraged to submit papers describing applications. Application papers should provide an indication of the real-world relevance of the problem that is solved, including a description of the domain, and an evaluation of performance, usability, or comparison to alternative approaches. Experience papers are also welcome, especially if they highlight insights into any aspect of design, implementation or management of self-* systems that would be of benefit to practitioners and the SASO community. All submissions will be rigorously peer reviewed and evaluated based on the quality of their technical contribution, originality, soundness, significance, presentation, understanding of the state of the art, and overall quality.

Contact Information

Conference General Chair

Ada Diaconescu Telecom Paris-Tech, Paris, FR

Program Chairs

Peter Lewis, Aston University, Birmingham, UK

Sam Malek, University of California, Irvine, USA

Hella Seebach, Augsburg University, Augsburg, DE

FAS* 2017 Call for Workshops

Workshops now open for the  FAS* (ICCAC and SASO) conferences in Arizona in September

The FAS 2017 Steering Committee invites proposals for the Workshop Program to be held along with the technical conferences SASO 2017 and ICCAC 2017. FASW workshops will provide a meeting for presenting novel ideas in a less formal and possibly  ore focused way than the conferences themselves. Their aim is to stimulate and facilitate active exchange, interaction, and comparison of approaches, methods, and ideas related to specific topics, both theoretical and applied, in the general area of Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems as well as Cloud and Autonomic Computing. To motivate the discussion and participation of all the workshop attendants, we encourage organizers to get away of the typical "mini-conference" format of a workshop, and include more discussion sessions, panels, etc. Members from all areas of the SASO and ICCAC communities are invited to submit workshop proposals for review. Workshops on global challenges, applications or on new and emerging topics are particularly encouraged. Workshops can vary in length, but most will be one full day in duration. Optionally, if desired by the organizers, workshop proceedings can be published through IEEE. Attendance of workshops will be included in the registration fee for the main SASO/ICCAC conference.

Important dates

  • Workshop proposal submission deadline: April 7, 2017
  • Workshop acceptance notification: April 14, 2017
  • CfP submission deadline: April 21, 2017
  • Workshop paper submission deadline: July 7, 2017
  • Workshop paper acceptance notification: July 21, 2017
  • Early registration deadline: TBD
  • Camera-ready papers due: July 26, 2017
  • Workshop notes submission to workshop chairs: July 28, 2017
  • Workshops dates: September 18 & 22, 2017
* Please submit your workshop proposals as soon as possible (i.e. before April 7)! We will try to decide earlier on workshop acceptance in order to give the organizers more time to solicit papers.

Requirements for submission

Proposals for workshops should be separated in two parts. The first part should be organized as preliminary call for papers or call for participation, depending on the intended format of the workshop, with a maximum of two pages and contain the following information:

PART 1:

  • Title of the workshop.
  • A brief technical description of the workshop, specifying the workshop goals, the technical issues that it will address, and the relevance of the workshop to the main conferences. Please specify, which of the two main conferences the workshop assigned to (if any)!
  • Description of paper review process (if any) and acceptance standards in order to keep the workshop high in quality. Note that papers must be in the same format as the conference proceedings and may not be more than 6 pages in length.
  • The names, affiliations, postal addresses, phone numbers, and email addresses of the proposed workshop organizing committee. This committee should consist of three or four people knowledgeable about the technical issues to be addressed. The organizing committee should include individuals from multiple institutions.
  • The primary email address for contacting the organizing committee.
  • Expected duration of the workshop (half or full day). - A brief description of the workshop format.
  • List of potential program committee members (if applicable), including their title and affiliations.
  • List of potential invited speakers, panelists, or disputants (if applicable).
PART 2:

The second part with a maximum of three pages should contain additional information not suitable for a Call for Papers, including:

  • A discussion of why and to whom the workshop is of interest.
  • A list of related workshops held within the last three years, if any, and their relation to the proposed workshop.
  • Information about previous offerings of the proposed workshop: when and where it has been offered in the past, organizers names and affiliations, number of submissions, acceptances and registered attendees.
  • An indication of the envisaged acceptance rate (if applicable).
  • A description of the qualifications of the individual committee members with respect to organizing a SASO or ICCAC workshop, including a list of workshops previously arranged by any members of the proposed organizing committee, if any.
  • A list of places (distribution lists, web sites, journals, etc.) where the workshop is planned to be advertised.
All proposals should be submitted in plain ASCII text or PDF format by electronic mail to the FASW 2017 Workshop Chairs, via Christopher Frantz, as described below.

Selection Criteria

The selection of the workshops to be included in the final FAS
2017 Workshop program will be based upon multiple factors, including:
  • the scientific/technical interest of the topics,
  • the quality of the proposal,
  • complementarity with the conference topics,
  • balance and distinctness of workshop topics, and
  • the capacity of the conference workshop program.
Note that authors of proposals addressing similar and/or overlapping content areas and/or audiences may be requested to merge their proposals.

Responsibilities of FAS 2017 Workshop Chairs

For all accepted proposals, FAS 2017 will be responsible for:
  • Providing publicity for the workshop series as a whole. - Providing logistical support and a meeting place for the workshops.
  • Together with the organizers, determining the workshop date and time.
  • Liaising and coordinating between the workshop chairs and the finance chair, publicity chair, registration chair, and web chair for FAS.
  • Arranging for publication of proceedings.

Responsibilities of Workshop Organizers

Workshop organizers will be responsible for the following:
  • Setting up a web site for the workshop.
  • Advertising the workshop (and the main FAS conference), and issuing a call for papers and a call for participation.
  • Collecting and evaluating submissions, notifying authors of acceptance or rejection on a timely basis, and ensuring a transparent and fair selection process. All workshop organizers commit themselves to adopt the deadlines set by the committee.
  • Making the pdf of the whole workshop notes available to the workshop chair, as well as a list of audio-visual requirements and any special room requirements.
  • Writing a 1-page organizers' introduction for the workshop proceedings. Ensuring that the workshop organizers and the participants register for the workshop and/or the main conference (at least one author must register for the paper to appear in the proceedings).
FAS* reserves the right to cancel any workshop if the above responsibilities are not fulfilled, or if too few attendees register for the workshop to support its running costs.

Submissions and Inquiries

Please send proposals (as a PDF document) and inquiries to: Christopher Frantz (cf@christopherfrantz.org) or Jeremy Pitt (j.pitt@imperial.ac.uk)

https://saso2017.telecom-paristech.fr/committees.html

CfP: Collective adaptive systems

A special track of the 32nd ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC'17) looking for contributions.

COLLECTIVE ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS

Special Track of the 32nd ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC'17) http://sac-cas2017.apice.unibo.it April 3 - 7, 2017 Marrakech, Morocco

Nowadays, most aspects of our daily life are affected by pervasive technology, consisting of massive numbers of heterogeneous units/nodes (computers, devices, software applications, smart objects, etc.), complex interactions, and humans-in-the-loop. The distributed and open nature of these systems and their large scale make sensing, decision-making, planning and acting possibly highly dispersed: this may cause on the one hand the emergence of unexpected phenomena, but on the other hand it can be the key to support inherent adaptation and resilience.

These complex systems are typically referred to as Collective Adaptive Systems (CAS). They have to be equipped with dynamic and autonomous adaptation capabilities, to deal with changes in their working environments and within themselves. CAS involve huge collections of cooperating components, trading off individual tasks, properties, objectives and actions, with overall system goals.

To properly engineer and exploit CAS, a deep scientific understanding of the principles underpinning their operation is required. The development of CAS is closely related to other contemporary (software) engineering approaches, such as component-based systems and middleware platforms, as well as other Computer Science areas, such as Distributed Artificial Intelligence, Formal Methods, Agent-based Programming, Pervasive Computing, Internet of Things, and Autonomic Computing. This track aims at providing a common forum for discussing the various different viewpoints over CAS, attracting relevant and consistent contributions from different research communities, with the ultimate goal of filling the gap between theory and practice, hence paving the way towards implementation of relevant applications.

The Special Track on Collective Adaptive Systems takes deliberately a broad view of what CAS are and how they should be designed, analysed, built and deployed. In particular, the track's interest is both in the foundational view (e.g., theories, methods, formalisms, models) and the practical aspects (e.g., development methodologies, programming languages, middleware, development and runtime environments, tools). Moreover, also applications of CAS solutions to real-world case studies are welcomed.

Major topics of interest this year will include the following:

  • Novel models, languages, programming and implementation techniques for CAS
  • CAS technologies and infrastructures
  • CAS applications
  • Scenarios, case studies and experience reports of CAS
  • Formal aspects (semantics, reasoning, verification) in CAS development
  • Business Processes in CAS - Self-* and emerging properties of CAS
  • Security and privacy in CAS - Policy-based coordination and self-adaptation in CAS
  • Middleware platforms for CAS
  • Software architectures and engineering methodologies for CAS

Important Dates

Sep 15, 2016: Papers and SRC research abstracts submission Nov 10, 2016: Author notification Nov 25, 2016: Camera-ready copies Dec 10, 2016: Author registration

Programme Co-Chairs

Mirko Viroli Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Italy http://mirkoviroli.apice.unibo.it email: mirko.viroli@unibo.it

Francesco Tiezzi University of Camerino, Italy http://tiezzi.unicam.it/ email: francesco.tiezzi@ unicam.it

Program Committee Members

  • Jacob Beal, BBN Technologies, USA
  • Olivier Boissier, Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, France
  • Tomas Bures, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
  • Siobhan Clarke, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
  • Daniel Coore, University of the West Indies, Jamaica
  • Ferruccio Damiani, University of Torino, Italy Rocco De Nicola, IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca, Italy
  • Giovanna Di Marzo Serugendo, University of Geneve, Switzerland
  • Simon Dobson, University of St Andrews
  • Schahram Dustdar, TU Wien, Austria
  • Kurt Geihs, Universitaet Kassel, Germany
  • Jane Hillston, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Christine Julien, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  • Hung La, University of Nevada, Reno, USA
  • Peter Lewis, Aston University, UK
  • Alberto Lluch Lafuente, DTU, Denmark
  • Michele Loreti, University of Firenze, Italy
  • Andrea Omicini, University of Bologna, Italy
  • Carlo Pinciroli, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Canada
  • Rosario Pugliese, University of Firenze, Italy
  • Barbara Re, University of Camerino, Italy
  • Jan-Philipp Steghöfer, Chalmers Technical University, Sweden
  • Martin Wirsing, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Germany
  • Franco Zambonelli, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

Proceedings

Papers accepted for the Special Track on Collective Adaptive Systems will be published by ACM both in the SAC 2017 proceedings and in the Digital Library.

CAS Special Track organisers also plan to invite authors of selected papers for a Special Issue in a high impact journal, such as ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems or Science of Computer Programming.

Paper submission and format

All papers should represent original and previously unpublished works that currently are not under review in any conference or journal.

The author(s) name(s) and address(es) must NOT appear in the body of the paper, and self-reference should be in the third person. This is to facilitate blind review. Only the title should be shown at the first page without the authors' information.

Submitted papers must be in the ACM two-column page format (doc template, pdf template, latex template). The length of the papers is 6 pages (included in the registration) plus up to 2 extra pages (at extra charge), i.e. total 8 pages maximum.

Paper registration is required, allowing the inclusion of the paper/poster in the conference proceedings. An author or a proxy attending SAC MUST present the paper: This is a requirement for the paper/poster to be included in the ACM/IEEE digital library. No-show of scheduled papers and posters will result in excluding them from the ACM/IEEE digital library.

Submission is entirely automated via the STAR Submission System, which is available from:

Poster Sessions

Papers that received high reviews (that is acceptable by reviewer standards) but were not accepted due to space limitation can be invited for the poster session. Poster should be not longer than 3 pages (included in the registration) plus 1 extra page (at extra charge), i.e. total 4 pages maximum. The poster session procedures and details will be posted on SAC 2017 website as soon as they become available.

Student research abstracts competition

Graduate students are invited to submit Student Research Competition (SRC) abstracts (maximum of 2 pages in ACM camera-ready format) following the instructions published at SAC 2017 website. Submission of the same abstract to multiple tracks is not allowed. All research abstract submissions will be reviewed by researchers and practitioners with expertise in the track focus area to which they are submitted. Authors of selected abstracts (up to 20 students) will have the opportunity to give poster and oral presentations of their work and compete for three top-winning places. The winners will receive medals, cash awards, and SIGAPP recognition certificates during the conference banquet. Invited students receive SRC travel support (US$500) and are eligible to apply to the SIGAPP Student Travel Award Program (STAP) for additional travel support.

Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self-* Systems (FAS*W)

There is a doctoral symposium at the SASO  conference this year.

Call For Doctoral Symposium Submissions Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self- Systems (FASW)

Augsburg, Germany, September 12 & 16, 2016

EXTENDED DEADLINES:

Abstract Submission due: June 12, 2016 Paper Submission due: June 20, 2016 http://fasstar2016.informatik.uni-augsburg.de/ http://iccac2016.se.rit.edu/ http://uni-augsburg.de/saso2016 @SASO2016Conf

Foundations and Applications of Self Systems (FAS) is the umbrella for two closely related but independent conferences, the International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems (SASO) and the International Conference on Cloud and Autonomic Computing (ICCAC). The FAS Doctoral Symposium provides an international forum for PhD Students working in research areas addressed by FAS. In this forum, PhD students will get unique opportunities to subject their research to the scrutiny of external experts, gain experience in the presentation of research, connect to peers and experts addressing similar problems, and get advice from a panel of internationally leading researchers.

Different from the technical tracks of the conference, the FAS* Doctoral Symposium focuses on the specific needs of young researchers at the beginning of their career. As such, particular emphasis will be placed on a critical and constructive feedback that shall help participants to successfully conclude their PhD studies.

PhD students working in any area addressed by the FAS conferences are invited to submit a Doctoral Symposium paper in which they describe the key motivation and objectives of their research project, and reflect on the methodology as well as the current status of their PhD studies. Complementing the thematic focus of FAS, we particularly solicit contributions in the following areas:

Engineering of self-organizing and self-adaptive systems. We solicit theoretical and applied works addressing fundamental principles underlying self-organizing systems, as well as methods that allow to quantify, model and reproduce the self- characteristics of complex systems in biological, social, physical and technical systems. Examples include mechanisms underlying distributed decision- making and collective intelligence, software engineering challenges in self-adaptive systems, as well as general application of self- principles in the engineering of technical systems.

Complex Cyber-physical and socio-technical systems. We welcome contributions that apply self-* principles to address challenges in the design of complex cyber- physical and socio-technical systems. Particular examples include smart grid infrastructures, sensor networks, opportunistic networking scenarios, as well as large-scale social information systems. Works addressing challenges such as the security, privacy and anonymity of users, or mechanisms to prevent censorship, manipulation or unfairness in socio-technical systems are especially welcome. We further solicit works on socio- technical and socio-economic challenges in P2P systems, such as the design of incentive, trust and reputation mechanisms.

Self- approaches in Massive-Scale Decentralized Systems. Works in this area use self- approaches to address challenges in the design and operation of massive scale decentralized systems. Examples include Peer-to-Peer technologies, as well as overlay topology management schemes. We are further interested in decentralized data mining and machine learning approaches, as well as decentralized approaches to monitor, model and adapt distributed systems. Works using self-* principles to address the inherent challenges in the design of massive-scale systems with unreliable and heterogeneous are of particular interest.

Autonomic Computing. Systems Here we are interested in all works addressing the self-configuration, self-optimization and self-adaptation of cloud computing services, data centers and general distributed computing systems. Examples for questions addressed in this area include the monitoring and modeling of cloud services, the design of efficient resource allocation mechanisms, the application of data mining and machine learning techniques to analyze and predict the behavior of technical systems, as well as the characterization of distributed computing workloads.

Application of Self- in Robotics and Spatial Computing. Finally, we welcome contributions using self- principles in the areas of robotics, swarm robotics and spatial computing. Here, examples for works of interest include environmental modeling and perception, machine vision, and self-adaptation mechanisms in robotics, distributed coordination and collective intelligence in multi- robot systems, as well as novel paradigms for the programming of autonomous, spatially distributed entities.

Submission Instructions

Submissions should have a length of max. six pages and be formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Authors should submit their papers using the EasyChair installation of the main conference, which is available at:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=saso2016

Please note that only single-author submissions are accepted, which focus on the topic of the doctoral work. The name of the supervisor (« supervised by ... ») should be clearly marked below the author’s name in the paper. Submissions should further adhere to the following structure:

  • Motivation: motivate the open problem that you want to address and briefly summarize existing approaches along with their deficiencies.
  • Objectives: describe the key objectives of your PhD project and argue how achieving them will solve the open problem outlined in the motivation.
  • Methodology: outline what methodology you will adopt to meet the objectives of your project. Clearly state on what existing works your work will build.
  • Research Plan: describe what preliminary results – if any – you have already achieved and summarize your plans for future work. Please add a rough schedule that allows to judge whether your research plan is feasible.
Authors of accepted papers shall prepare a final, camera ready version of the paper, taking into account all feedback from reviewers, and formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Doctoral Symposium papers will be advertised in the final program, and will be submitted to IEEE Xplore as part of the SASO proceedings. Papers will also be made available in the IEEE Digital Library.

Review Process

Each submission will be reviewed by at least two Doctoral Symposium experts (see list below) that cover the different areas of interest of the conference. Submissions will be evaluated based on their relevance to FAS*, the motivation and quality of the proposed research, as well as the suitability of the chosen methodology.

Authors of accepted papers will have different opportunities to present their project at the conference. Besides a full presentation during the PhD Symposium session, an “Elevator Pitch Session” will be organized during the main conference, where authors get the chance to briefly showcase their research. In addition, the Best Doctoral Symposium paper will be selected and the award will be presented during the main conference. Finally, selected authors will have the additional chance to present their work via a poster in the poster session of the main conference.

Invited Talk

To be announced

Doctoral Symposium Experts

  • Ozalp Babaoglu – University of Bologna, IT
  • Jacob Beal – BBN Technologies, USA
  • Kurt Geihs – Universitaet Kassel, DE
  • Tom Holvoet – KU Leuven, BE
  • Manish Parashar – Rutgers University, USA
  • Jeremy Pitt – Imperial College London, UK
  • Mark Jelasity – University of Szeged, HU
  • Burkhard Stiller – University of Zurich, CH
  • Giuseppe Valetto – Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT
  • Salim Hariri – University of Arizona, USA
  • Simon Dobson – University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK
  • Antonio Bucchiarone - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT

Important Dates (Extended)

Abstract Submission due (extended): June 12, 2016 Paper Submission due (extended): June 20, 2016 Notifications due: July 10, 2016 Camera ready version due: July 24, 2016 Conference date: September 12-16, 2016

Contact Information

For any further information, please contact the Doctoral Symposium chairs:

Pradeep Murukannaiah Department of Computer Science North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, 27606, USA pmuruka@ncsu.edu http://www4.ncsu.edu/~pmuruka/

Dr. Ingo Scholtes Chair of Systems Design ETH Zurich CH-8092 Zurich Switzerland ischoltes@ethz.ch http://www.ingoscholtes.net

Essays in Idleness and Hôjôki

Yoshida Kenkō

1332


Two medieval Japanese classics in one.

Hojoki is a a short, simple parable of a monk's efforts towards enlightenment. There's a sting in the tail whereby, after describing his efforts to simplify his life, Chomei (the author) then concludes that he's become too attached to his own efforts, that his road to enlightenment is actually a source of attachment in its own right. In that sense the essay is almost a lengthy Zen koan on the dangers of pride, attachment, and effort.

Kenko's Essays in idleness is much harder to define, by contrast. It's part philosophy, part a gossipy history of events and anecdotes in a lost era. There are some fabulously quotable sections:


What happiness it is to sit in intimate conversation with someone of like mind, warmed by candid discussion of the amusing and fleeting ways of the world. But such a friend is hard to find, and instead you sit there doing your best to fit in with whatever the other is saying, feeling deeply alone.


and:


It is a most wonderful comfort to sit alone beneath a lamp, book spread before you, and coming with someone from the past whom you have never met


Amongst the anecdotes are some really wonderful examples of Japanese manners that are to some degree maintained into the present, for example of the right (and wrong) ways to put oneself forward to do something for someone else, without in the process claiming any undue worth or ability for oneself. And it's fascinating that Kenko, writing in the twelfth century, complains in surprisingly modern terms about how is age is shallow and uncultured compared to elder times: a complaint that never seems to age. It's precisely this mixture of the sublime and the commonplace that makes the Essays such a joy for me.

Finished on Sat, 27 Feb 2016 10:42:15 -0800.   Rating 4*/5*.

Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self-* Systems 2016

The call for participation in the FAS 2016 doctoral symposium is now open.

FASW 2016 (SASO and ICCAC) Call For Doctoral Symposium Submissions Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self- Systems (FAS*W)

Augsburg, Germany, September 12 & 16, 2016 http://fasstar2016.informatik.uni-augsburg.de/ http://iccac2016.se.rit.edu/ http://uni-augsburg.de/saso2016 @SASO2016Conf

Foundations and Applications of Self Systems (FAS) is the umbrella for two closely related but independent conferences, the International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems (SASO) and the International Conference on Cloud and Autonomic Computing (ICCAC). The FAS Doctoral Symposium provides an international forum for PhD Students working in research areas addressed by FAS. In this forum, PhD students will get unique opportunities to subject their research to the scrutiny of external experts, gain experience in the presentation of research, connect to peers and experts addressing similar problems, and get advice from a panel of internationally leading researchers. Different from the technical tracks of the conference, the FAS* Doctoral Symposium focuses on the specific needs of young researchers at the beginning of their career. As such, particular emphasis will be placed on a critical and constructive feedback that shall help participants to successfully conclude their PhD studies.

PhD students working in any area addressed by the FAS conferences are invited to submit a Doctoral Symposium paper in which they describe the key motivation and objectives of their research project, and reflect on the methodology as well as the current status of their PhD studies. Complementing the thematic focus of FAS, we particularly solicit contributions in the following areas:

  • Engineering of self-organizing and self-adaptive systems. We solicit theoretical and applied works addressing fundamental principles underlying self-organizing systems, as well as methods that allow to quantify, model and reproduce the self- characteristics of complex systems in biological, social, physical and technical systems. Examples include mechanisms underlying distributed decision- making and collective intelligence, software engineering challenges in self-adaptive systems, as well as general application of self- principles in the engineering of technical systems.
  • Complex Cyber-physical and socio-technical systems. We welcome contributions that apply self- principles to address challenges in the design of complex cyber- physical and socio-technical systems. Particular examples include smart grid infrastructures, sensor networks, opportunistic networking scenarios, as well as large-scale social information systems. Works addressing challenges such as the security, privacy and anonymity of users, or mechanisms to prevent censorship, manipulation or unfairness in socio-technical systems are especially welcome. We further solicit works on socio- technical and socio-economic challenges in P2P systems, such as the design of incentive, trust and reputation mechanisms.
  • Self- approaches in Massive-Scale Decentralized Systems. Works in this area use self- approaches to address challenges in the design and operation of massive scale decentralized systems. Examples include Peer-to-Peer technologies, as well as overlay topology management schemes. We are further interested in decentralized data mining and machine learning approaches, as well as decentralized approaches to monitor, model and adapt distributed systems. Works using self- principles to address the inherent challenges in the design of massive-scale systems with unreliable and heterogeneous are of particular interest.
  • Autonomic Computing Systems. Here we are interested in all works addressing the self-configuration, self-optimization and self-adaptation of cloud computing services, data centers and general distributed computing systems. Examples for questions addressed in this area include the monitoring and modeling of cloud services, the design of efficient resource allocation mechanisms, the application of data mining and machine learning techniques to analyze and predict the behavior of technical systems, as well as the characterization of distributed computing workloads.
  • Application of Self- in Robotics and Spatial Computing, Finally, we welcome contributions using self- principles in the areas of robotics, swarm robotics and spatial computing. Here, examples for works of interest include environmental modeling and perception, machine vision, and self-adaptation mechanisms in robotics, distributed coordination and collective intelligence in multi- robot systems, as well as novel paradigms for the programming of autonomous, spatially distributed entities.

Submission Instructions

Submissions should have a length of max. six pages and be formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Authors should submit their papers using the EasyChair installation of the main conference, which is available at:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=saso2016

Please note that only single-author submissions are accepted, which focus on the topic of the doctoral work. The name of the supervisor (« supervised by ... ») should be clearly marked below the author’s name in the paper. Submissions should further adhere to the following structure:

  • Motivation: motivate the open problem that you want to address and briefly summarize existing approaches along with their deficiencies.
  • Objectives: describe the key objectives of your PhD project and argue how achieving them will solve the open problem outlined in the motivation.
  • Methodology: outline what methodology you will adopt to meet the objectives of your project. Clearly state on what existing works your work will build.
  • Research Plan: describe what preliminary results – if any – you have already achieved and summarize your plans for future work. Please add a rough schedule that allows to judge whether your research plan is feasible.
Authors of accepted papers shall prepare a final, camera ready version of the paper, taking into account all feedback from reviewers, and formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Doctoral Symposium papers will be advertised in the final program, and will be submitted to IEEE Xplore as part of the SASO proceedings. Papers will also be made available in the IEEE Digital Library.

Review Process

Each submission will be reviewed by at least two Doctoral Symposium experts (see list below) that cover the different areas of interest of the conference. Submissions will be evaluated based on their relevance to FAS*, the motivation and quality of the proposed research, as well as the suitability of the chosen methodology.

Authors of accepted papers will have different opportunities to present their project at the conference. Besides a full presentation during the PhD Symposium session, an “Elevator Pitch Session” will be organized during the main conference, where authors get the chance to briefly showcase their research. In addition, the Best Doctoral Symposium paper will be selected and the award will be presented during the main conference. Finally, selected authors will have the additional chance to present their work via a poster in the poster session of the main conference.

Invited Talk

To be announced

Doctoral Symposium Experts

  • Ozalp Babaoglu – University of Bologna, IT
  • Jacob Beal – BBN Technologies, USA
  • Kurt Geihs – Universitaet Kassel, DE
  • Tom Holvoet – KU Leuven, BE
  • Manish Parashar – Rutgers University, USA
  • Jeremy Pitt – Imperial College London, UK
  • Mark Jelasity – University of Szeged, HU
  • Burkhard Stiller – University of Zurich, CH
  • Giuseppe Valetto – Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT
  • Salim Hariri – University of Arizona, USA
  • Simon Dobson – University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK
  • Antonio Bucchiarone - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT
To be completed

Important Dates

Abstract Submission due: May 29, 2016 Paper Submission due: June 12, 2016 Notifications due: July 10, 2016 Camera ready version due: July 24, 2016 Conference date: September 12-16, 2016

Contact Information

For any further information, please contact the Doctoral Symposium chairs:

Pradeep Murukannaiah Department of Computer Scienc North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, 27606, USA pmuruka@ncsu.edu http://www4.ncsu.edu/~pmuruka/

Dr. Ingo Scholtes Chair of Systems Design ETH Zurich CH-8092 Zurich Switzerland ischoltes@ethz.ch http://www.ingoscholtes.net

Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys

Michael Collins

1974


Truly an inspirational read. Collins' personality comes through perfectly: human, humble, excited by his luck, a keen observer of technical and human features and frailties, not trying to sound other than he is.

This is a book about the space programme taken broadly, perhaps best exemplified by the fact that it takes until page 364 (of 478) to get to the take-off of Apollo 11. Collins talks about his history in joining the programme (at the second attempt), his experiences in the Gemini programme before Apollo, the tensions and differences that went into the design, testing, and flight of the vehicles themselves. He deals frankly with his flight experiences and his lack of jealousy at not actually making a moon landing himself: he probably could have done on a later mission had he not consciously decided beforehand to walk away from spaceflight after Apollo 11. He is fascinating on the subject of his own isolation in the orbiting command module, which he found far from lonely and which led to an amazing exchange with Charles Lindbergh, himself no stranger to solo flight.

His relationship with his flight companions is extraordinary, perhaps because he is the most outgoing of the group (Neil Armstrong coming "a distant second" in terms of self-containment to John Young, his commander on Gemini 10). Collins clearly feels something of a lack in his communications with these other men, in that they interact almost purely technically without sharing their inner experiences: one gets the feeling he would have liked to hear more from them, but realised he could never open them up.

Finished on Fri, 08 Jan 2016 07:23:05 -0800.   Rating 5*/5*.