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Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self-* Systems (FAS*W)

There is a doctoral symposium at the SASO  conference this year.

Call For Doctoral Symposium Submissions Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self- Systems (FASW)

Augsburg, Germany, September 12 & 16, 2016

EXTENDED DEADLINES:

Abstract Submission due: June 12, 2016 Paper Submission due: June 20, 2016 http://fasstar2016.informatik.uni-augsburg.de/ http://iccac2016.se.rit.edu/ http://uni-augsburg.de/saso2016 @SASO2016Conf

Foundations and Applications of Self Systems (FAS) is the umbrella for two closely related but independent conferences, the International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems (SASO) and the International Conference on Cloud and Autonomic Computing (ICCAC). The FAS Doctoral Symposium provides an international forum for PhD Students working in research areas addressed by FAS. In this forum, PhD students will get unique opportunities to subject their research to the scrutiny of external experts, gain experience in the presentation of research, connect to peers and experts addressing similar problems, and get advice from a panel of internationally leading researchers.

Different from the technical tracks of the conference, the FAS* Doctoral Symposium focuses on the specific needs of young researchers at the beginning of their career. As such, particular emphasis will be placed on a critical and constructive feedback that shall help participants to successfully conclude their PhD studies.

PhD students working in any area addressed by the FAS conferences are invited to submit a Doctoral Symposium paper in which they describe the key motivation and objectives of their research project, and reflect on the methodology as well as the current status of their PhD studies. Complementing the thematic focus of FAS, we particularly solicit contributions in the following areas:

Engineering of self-organizing and self-adaptive systems. We solicit theoretical and applied works addressing fundamental principles underlying self-organizing systems, as well as methods that allow to quantify, model and reproduce the self- characteristics of complex systems in biological, social, physical and technical systems. Examples include mechanisms underlying distributed decision- making and collective intelligence, software engineering challenges in self-adaptive systems, as well as general application of self- principles in the engineering of technical systems.

Complex Cyber-physical and socio-technical systems. We welcome contributions that apply self-* principles to address challenges in the design of complex cyber- physical and socio-technical systems. Particular examples include smart grid infrastructures, sensor networks, opportunistic networking scenarios, as well as large-scale social information systems. Works addressing challenges such as the security, privacy and anonymity of users, or mechanisms to prevent censorship, manipulation or unfairness in socio-technical systems are especially welcome. We further solicit works on socio- technical and socio-economic challenges in P2P systems, such as the design of incentive, trust and reputation mechanisms.

Self- approaches in Massive-Scale Decentralized Systems. Works in this area use self- approaches to address challenges in the design and operation of massive scale decentralized systems. Examples include Peer-to-Peer technologies, as well as overlay topology management schemes. We are further interested in decentralized data mining and machine learning approaches, as well as decentralized approaches to monitor, model and adapt distributed systems. Works using self-* principles to address the inherent challenges in the design of massive-scale systems with unreliable and heterogeneous are of particular interest.

Autonomic Computing. Systems Here we are interested in all works addressing the self-configuration, self-optimization and self-adaptation of cloud computing services, data centers and general distributed computing systems. Examples for questions addressed in this area include the monitoring and modeling of cloud services, the design of efficient resource allocation mechanisms, the application of data mining and machine learning techniques to analyze and predict the behavior of technical systems, as well as the characterization of distributed computing workloads.

Application of Self- in Robotics and Spatial Computing. Finally, we welcome contributions using self- principles in the areas of robotics, swarm robotics and spatial computing. Here, examples for works of interest include environmental modeling and perception, machine vision, and self-adaptation mechanisms in robotics, distributed coordination and collective intelligence in multi- robot systems, as well as novel paradigms for the programming of autonomous, spatially distributed entities.

Submission Instructions

Submissions should have a length of max. six pages and be formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Authors should submit their papers using the EasyChair installation of the main conference, which is available at:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=saso2016

Please note that only single-author submissions are accepted, which focus on the topic of the doctoral work. The name of the supervisor (« supervised by ... ») should be clearly marked below the author’s name in the paper. Submissions should further adhere to the following structure:

  • Motivation: motivate the open problem that you want to address and briefly summarize existing approaches along with their deficiencies.
  • Objectives: describe the key objectives of your PhD project and argue how achieving them will solve the open problem outlined in the motivation.
  • Methodology: outline what methodology you will adopt to meet the objectives of your project. Clearly state on what existing works your work will build.
  • Research Plan: describe what preliminary results – if any – you have already achieved and summarize your plans for future work. Please add a rough schedule that allows to judge whether your research plan is feasible.

Authors of accepted papers shall prepare a final, camera ready version of the paper, taking into account all feedback from reviewers, and formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Doctoral Symposium papers will be advertised in the final program, and will be submitted to IEEE Xplore as part of the SASO proceedings. Papers will also be made available in the IEEE Digital Library.

Review Process

Each submission will be reviewed by at least two Doctoral Symposium experts (see list below) that cover the different areas of interest of the conference. Submissions will be evaluated based on their relevance to FAS*, the motivation and quality of the proposed research, as well as the suitability of the chosen methodology.

Authors of accepted papers will have different opportunities to present their project at the conference. Besides a full presentation during the PhD Symposium session, an “Elevator Pitch Session” will be organized during the main conference, where authors get the chance to briefly showcase their research. In addition, the Best Doctoral Symposium paper will be selected and the award will be presented during the main conference. Finally, selected authors will have the additional chance to present their work via a poster in the poster session of the main conference.

Invited Talk

To be announced

Doctoral Symposium Experts

  • Ozalp Babaoglu – University of Bologna, IT
  • Jacob Beal – BBN Technologies, USA
  • Kurt Geihs – Universitaet Kassel, DE
  • Tom Holvoet – KU Leuven, BE
  • Manish Parashar – Rutgers University, USA
  • Jeremy Pitt – Imperial College London, UK
  • Mark Jelasity – University of Szeged, HU
  • Burkhard Stiller – University of Zurich, CH
  • Giuseppe Valetto – Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT
  • Salim Hariri – University of Arizona, USA
  • Simon Dobson – University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK
  • Antonio Bucchiarone - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT

Important Dates (Extended)

Abstract Submission due (extended): June 12, 2016 Paper Submission due (extended): June 20, 2016 Notifications due: July 10, 2016 Camera ready version due: July 24, 2016 Conference date: September 12-16, 2016

Contact Information

For any further information, please contact the Doctoral Symposium chairs:

Pradeep Murukannaiah Department of Computer Science North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, 27606, USA pmuruka@ncsu.edu http://www4.ncsu.edu/~pmuruka/

Dr. Ingo Scholtes Chair of Systems Design ETH Zurich CH-8092 Zurich Switzerland ischoltes@ethz.ch http://www.ingoscholtes.net

Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self-* Systems 2016

The call for participation in the FAS 2016 doctoral symposium is now open.

FASW 2016 (SASO and ICCAC) Call For Doctoral Symposium Submissions Doctoral Symposium on Foundations and Applications of Self- Systems (FAS*W)

Augsburg, Germany, September 12 & 16, 2016 http://fasstar2016.informatik.uni-augsburg.de/ http://iccac2016.se.rit.edu/ http://uni-augsburg.de/saso2016 @SASO2016Conf

Foundations and Applications of Self Systems (FAS) is the umbrella for two closely related but independent conferences, the International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems (SASO) and the International Conference on Cloud and Autonomic Computing (ICCAC). The FAS Doctoral Symposium provides an international forum for PhD Students working in research areas addressed by FAS. In this forum, PhD students will get unique opportunities to subject their research to the scrutiny of external experts, gain experience in the presentation of research, connect to peers and experts addressing similar problems, and get advice from a panel of internationally leading researchers. Different from the technical tracks of the conference, the FAS* Doctoral Symposium focuses on the specific needs of young researchers at the beginning of their career. As such, particular emphasis will be placed on a critical and constructive feedback that shall help participants to successfully conclude their PhD studies.

PhD students working in any area addressed by the FAS conferences are invited to submit a Doctoral Symposium paper in which they describe the key motivation and objectives of their research project, and reflect on the methodology as well as the current status of their PhD studies. Complementing the thematic focus of FAS, we particularly solicit contributions in the following areas:

  • Engineering of self-organizing and self-adaptive systems. We solicit theoretical and applied works addressing fundamental principles underlying self-organizing systems, as well as methods that allow to quantify, model and reproduce the self-* characteristics of complex systems in biological, social, physical and technical systems. Examples include mechanisms underlying distributed decision- making and collective intelligence, software engineering challenges in self-adaptive systems, as well as general application of self-* principles in the engineering of technical systems.
  • Complex Cyber-physical and socio-technical systems. We welcome contributions that apply self-* principles to address challenges in the design of complex cyber- physical and socio-technical systems. Particular examples include smart grid infrastructures, sensor networks, opportunistic networking scenarios, as well as large-scale social information systems. Works addressing challenges such as the security, privacy and anonymity of users, or mechanisms to prevent censorship, manipulation or unfairness in socio-technical systems are especially welcome. We further solicit works on socio- technical and socio-economic challenges in P2P systems, such as the design of incentive, trust and reputation mechanisms.
  • Self-* approaches in Massive-Scale Decentralized Systems. Works in this area use self-* approaches to address challenges in the design and operation of massive scale decentralized systems. Examples include Peer-to-Peer technologies, as well as overlay topology management schemes. We are further interested in decentralized data mining and machine learning approaches, as well as decentralized approaches to monitor, model and adapt distributed systems. Works using self-* principles to address the inherent challenges in the design of massive-scale systems with unreliable and heterogeneous are of particular interest.
  • Autonomic Computing Systems. Here we are interested in all works addressing the self-configuration, self-optimization and self-adaptation of cloud computing services, data centers and general distributed computing systems. Examples for questions addressed in this area include the monitoring and modeling of cloud services, the design of efficient resource allocation mechanisms, the application of data mining and machine learning techniques to analyze and predict the behavior of technical systems, as well as the characterization of distributed computing workloads.
  • Application of Self-* in Robotics and Spatial Computing, Finally, we welcome contributions using self-* principles in the areas of robotics, swarm robotics and spatial computing. Here, examples for works of interest include environmental modeling and perception, machine vision, and self-adaptation mechanisms in robotics, distributed coordination and collective intelligence in multi- robot systems, as well as novel paradigms for the programming of autonomous, spatially distributed entities.

Submission Instructions

Submissions should have a length of max. six pages and be formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Authors should submit their papers using the EasyChair installation of the main conference, which is available at:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=saso2016

Please note that only single-author submissions are accepted, which focus on the topic of the doctoral work. The name of the supervisor (« supervised by ... ») should be clearly marked below the author’s name in the paper. Submissions should further adhere to the following structure:

  • Motivation: motivate the open problem that you want to address and briefly summarize existing approaches along with their deficiencies.
  • Objectives: describe the key objectives of your PhD project and argue how achieving them will solve the open problem outlined in the motivation.
  • Methodology: outline what methodology you will adopt to meet the objectives of your project. Clearly state on what existing works your work will build.
  • Research Plan: describe what preliminary results – if any – you have already achieved and summarize your plans for future work. Please add a rough schedule that allows to judge whether your research plan is feasible.

Authors of accepted papers shall prepare a final, camera ready version of the paper, taking into account all feedback from reviewers, and formatted according to the IEEE Computer Society Press proceedings style guide. Doctoral Symposium papers will be advertised in the final program, and will be submitted to IEEE Xplore as part of the SASO proceedings. Papers will also be made available in the IEEE Digital Library.

Review Process

Each submission will be reviewed by at least two Doctoral Symposium experts (see list below) that cover the different areas of interest of the conference. Submissions will be evaluated based on their relevance to FAS*, the motivation and quality of the proposed research, as well as the suitability of the chosen methodology.

Authors of accepted papers will have different opportunities to present their project at the conference. Besides a full presentation during the PhD Symposium session, an “Elevator Pitch Session” will be organized during the main conference, where authors get the chance to briefly showcase their research. In addition, the Best Doctoral Symposium paper will be selected and the award will be presented during the main conference. Finally, selected authors will have the additional chance to present their work via a poster in the poster session of the main conference.

Invited Talk

To be announced

Doctoral Symposium Experts

  • Ozalp Babaoglu – University of Bologna, IT
  • Jacob Beal – BBN Technologies, USA
  • Kurt Geihs – Universitaet Kassel, DE
  • Tom Holvoet – KU Leuven, BE
  • Manish Parashar – Rutgers University, USA
  • Jeremy Pitt – Imperial College London, UK
  • Mark Jelasity – University of Szeged, HU
  • Burkhard Stiller – University of Zurich, CH
  • Giuseppe Valetto – Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT
  • Salim Hariri – University of Arizona, USA
  • Simon Dobson – University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK
  • Antonio Bucchiarone - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, IT

To be completed

Important Dates

Abstract Submission due: May 29, 2016 Paper Submission due: June 12, 2016 Notifications due: July 10, 2016 Camera ready version due: July 24, 2016 Conference date: September 12-16, 2016

Contact Information

For any further information, please contact the Doctoral Symposium chairs:

Pradeep Murukannaiah Department of Computer Scienc North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, 27606, USA pmuruka@ncsu.edu http://www4.ncsu.edu/~pmuruka/

Dr. Ingo Scholtes Chair of Systems Design ETH Zurich CH-8092 Zurich Switzerland ischoltes@ethz.ch http://www.ingoscholtes.net

CfP: Spatial and Collective Awareness workshop at SASO'15

The first workshop on Spatial Awareness is being held in Boston in September as part of the SASO conference.

First International Workshop on Spatial and COllective PErvasive Computing Systems (SCOPES) Workshop

Co-located with IEEE SASO 2015, located at MIT, Cambridge, USA

September 21, 2015

http://www.spatial-computing.org/scopes

Overview

This workshop aims at combining three distinct, yet closely related areas of research, which will likely together play a major role in producing the key technical results needed to develop large-scale adaptive distributed systems of future networked scenarios.

  • Spatial computing: Spatial computing systems are systems of individual entities, typically situated in a physical environment, in which the “functional goals” of the system are generally defined in terms of the system's spatial structure. Typically, such systems are developed following a self-organisation approach, making spatial patterns arise by emergence.
  • Collective adaptive systems: Collective computing systems are systems of tightly entangled components, achieving an overall goal through widespread cooperation, typically relying on self-adaptation techniques and collective/social intelligence.
  • Pervasive computing: Pervasive computing systems and the “Internet of Things” deal with current and emerging scenarios in which humans, sensors, mobile, and embedded devices engage in complex interactions in a shared environment.

The goal of this workshop is to foster the creation of general-purpose solutions for supporting the development of these kinds of systems, particularly as regards generalizable techniques and architectures. Topics of interest include:

  • Foundational models of spatially embedded collective systems, exhibiting resilience, robustness and scalability properties as required by emerging pervasive computing scenarios.
  • Tools and tool-chains targeting large-scale situated systems: programming or specification languages, compilers and proof-checking techniques, simulators, tools for property verification, libraries and APIs, supporting platforms, whole infrastructures.
  • Innovative methods and techniques for system development, including design patterns, software methodologies, best practices, and practical experience reports.
  • Applications contexts and scenarios of general interest to foster the identification of new problems and solutions, taking inspiration from cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, sensor networks, smart-cities, etc.

Paper submission

Papers should present original work and be no longer than 6 pages in the standard IEEE two-column format. All manuscripts should be submitted in PDF form through the submissions system for SCOPES at EasyChair. Papers will be peer reviewed on the basis of originality, readability, relevance to themes, soundness, and overall quality. Workshop proceedings will be published on IEEE Xplore in parallel with the main conference proceedings. Post-proceedings publication in a journal is planned. Questions should be addressed to saso.scopes2015@easychair.org.

Important Dates

Workshop paper submission: July 11, 2015 Notification of accepted papers: July 31, 2015 Camera-ready paper deadline: August 10, 2015 Workshop at SASO: September 21, 2015

Organisers

  • Dr. Jacob Beal (Raytheon BBN Technologies, USA)
  • Prof. Jane Hillson (University of Edinburgh, UK)
  • Dr. Mirko Viroli (University of Bologna, Italy)

Program Committee

  • Ezio Bartocci, TU Wien, Austria
  • Spring Berman, Arizona State University, USA
  • Luca Bortolussi, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Sven Brueckner, Axon Connected LLC, USA
  • Siobhan Clarke, Trinity College Dublin, IE
  • Daniel Coore, University of the West Indies
  • Jamaica Ferruccio Damiani, Università di Torino, Italy
  • Rocco De Nicola, IMT - Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca, Italy
  • Giovanna Di Marzo Serugendo, University of Geneve, Switzerland
  • Ada Diaconescu, Telecom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, France
  • Simon Dobson, University of St Andrews, UK
  • Matt Duckham, University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Stefan Dulman, CWI, Netherlands
  • Schahram Dustdar, TU Wien, Austria
  • Eva Kühn, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
  • Mieke Massink, CNR-ISTI, Italy
  • Mirco Musolesi, University College London UK
  • Silvia Nittel, University of Maine, USA
  • Antoine Spicher, LACL University Paris Est Creteil, France
  • Katia Sycara, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
  • Christof Teuscher, Portland State University, USA
  • Martin Wirsing, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Germany
  • Franco Zambonelli, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy